The Surrealistic Art of Rob Gonsalves

Acrobatic Engineering

Rob Gonsalves (born in 1959 in Toronto, Canada) is a canadian painter of magic realism with a unique perspective and style. He produces original works, limited edition prints and illustrations for his own books.
During his childhood, Gonsalves developed an interest in drawing from imagination using various media. By the age of twelve, his awareness of architecture grew as he learned perspective techniques and he began to create his first paintings and renderings of imagined buildings.
After an introduction to artists Dali and Tanguy, Gonsalves began his first surrealist paintings. The “Magic Realism” approach of Magritte along with the precise perspective illusions of Escher came to be influences in his future work.
In his post college years, Gonsalves worked full-time as an architect, also painting trompe-l’oeil murals and theater sets. After an enthusiastic response in 1990 at the Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition, Gonsalves devoted himself to painting full-time.
Although Gonsalves’ work is often categorized as surrealistic, it differs because the images are deliberately planned and result from conscious thought. Ideas are largely generated by the external world and involve recognizable human activities, using carefully planned illusionist devices. Gonsalves injects a sense of magic into realistic scenes. As a result, the term “Magic Realism” describes his work accurately. His work is an attempt to represent human beings’ desire to believe the impossible, to be open to possibility.
Source: Rob Gonsalves

A Change of Scenery II

Cathedral of Commerce

Towards the Horizon

The Sun Sets Sail

When the Lights Were Out

Ladies of the Lake

Water Dancers

The Listening Fields

Stepping Stones

Still Waters

Nocturnal Skating

The Phenomenon of Floating

Carved in Stone

Widow’s Walk

Widow’s Walk II

Light Flurries

Aspiring Acrobats

Image Source: Huckleberry Fine Art Gallery

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